Wednesday, 31 December 2014

Another Year Over: 2014 Review...

"Bluebell at the Battlefield Line" (R.Eborall)
Hi all. So, here we are, 2014 is all but over and we must do a little review. I've changed the format slightly for this years review. This time, to try and make it more tolerable, I've just chopped it into sections and highlighted a few points. So, firstly, Shackerstone. Its been a good year on the Battlefield Line for steam. Services began in March and in April we welcomed two visitors for our Steam Gala: old favourite GWR 5542 and SECR 'P' Class 0-6-0 No323 "Bluebell". The Bluebell Railway-based six-wheeler proved a punchy and popular performer and was in charge of trains across about six steaming days with us. Over the gala weekend I was rostered on both 323 and 5542 and had a great weekend. I was lucky enough to get out on 323 on another occasion a few weeks later, just before she returned to her famous home. For the rest of the year it has been GWR 3803 that has flown the flag for steam on Battlefield Line metals, though we do miss 5542 on occasions: it was just so good...
3803 has however been reliable and popular this last year, and I've had some great days out with her. On December 7th I finally passed my test to become a qualified Steam Engine Driver for the railway: a very proud day. It has been a long road and I've been crewing our engines since early 2008, as well as working with them for over a year before that as a humble underage cleaner. I've managed to amass some very valuable experience here at the Battlefield Line and still love being involved. 3803 is captured here at Market Bosworth with a Santa train on December 7th...
Also in December, "Sir Gomer" returned home having been to Burton for axlebox work. I was rostered out on the loco twice in December and had two great days with my old favourite. Moving swiftly on now to my engines: The Miniatures...
Having steamed in January, "Achilles": my 0-6-0 tank engine: was stripped down and repainted. The repaint did not go entirely to plan as boiler trouble involving a cracked main steam pipe halted running as soon as she was initially complete. Repairs were made and the loco languished in the workshop for a few months before my enthusiasm returned. She has since steamed on a few occasions and done me proud. In October, a new addition to the stable arrived: "Maisie". Dolled up as LNER No4436 of the famous Ivatt C1 4-4-2 Atlantics, my new engine has since been steamed and proved herself reliable. She is currently laid up in dock but will hopefully return to work in the coming weeks so I can finally see what she can really do. 4436 is seen here, prior to my first steaming with her, on the Coventry MES stand at the 2014 Midlands Model Engineering Exhibition...
Also on the miniature front, I've attended RPMR for my crew days in 2014. I had a very enjoyable afternoon at the August Steam Day for example, driving the clubs beautiful 0-4-0 Sweet Pea "Diane". As I write this post the sun in the picture is a distant memory as the frost thickens outside!...
"Diane In Action" (D.Strapps)
From the miniatures we change course from volunteering to leisure. We've had two excursions on the Main Line this year. In September we steamed from Bristol to Kingswear behind an immaculate "Bittern"; a member of Gresley's famous LNER A4 Pacific Class. Luckily the rain held off and the wind followed the train, allowing the A4 to make Kingswear pulling that full tender, ay Eddie? The shining A4 is spotted here at the outward Taunton water stop...
My my that "Torbay Express" outing with "Bittern" was a lovely day. In December we treated ourselves to a second main line outing, this time to Lincoln for the Lindum Christmas Fayre. Traction for this trip was Tyseley's wonderful 4900 Hall Class No4965 "Rood Ashton Hall" which put in some fabulous performances along the route. Those 49's really do bark...
"4965 Rood Ashton Hall at Barwell" (S.Lathlane)
Moving on from main line stuff we come back down to Narrow Gauge. Again, another great year for this section. We made three trips to Bala in 2014 and I must admit that the relentless "Three Course Challenges" laid down by 'Eddie the Late' did cause me some bother during the later visits. We have always been made so welcome at the BLR and have had some great times there. Its been our 'Holiday Railway'. In perfect sunshine: known to the locals as 'Alice Weather': 0-4-0 "Alice" stands in the loop at Bala Station in May...
In August, on our third visit, the famous Fireman David of Shackerstone joined us for a day out with "Maid Marian". We think he enjoyed his excursion to 2ft gauge and he captured this image of myself and 'Eddie the Late' with "Marian" awaiting departure from Bala...
"Odd Duo" (D.Hanks)
Lately, as well as Bala, we've also been invited to the fabulous Statfold Barn Railway. In 2014 I've made four visits there: three for Open Days and one for our Footplate Exams. In March myself and John had the Corpet and the duo were caught in action again with "Trangkil No4" in June. In September I was lucky enough to spend a day driving the Avonside "Marchlyn": a wonderful engine that has been beautifully restored. I am captured here along with 'Eddie the Late' at Statfold's March Open Day...
"Me And Ed at Statfold" (K.Eyre)
Having bored you all with railways we can now move on to road steam and my MTEW event. Learning from my experiences of organising the 2013 event, my Miniature Traction Engine Weekend returned to Market Bosworth in April. Well over 30 examples of the traction engine in 1.5" - 6" scales attended and the event was once again very well received. I have been working on the 2015 show since August time and anticipate well over 40 (more like 50) examples to attend this time. This event has been hard work to organise over the last three years but its always worth it and I've had some lovely comments and support from friends and railway members. Long may it continue...
"Saturday MTEW Line Up" (M.Ranieri)
The final section we come to is Days Out. In 2014 we've been all over the place. I've just chosen a few highlights to keep in with the review theme. In January the annual outing was made to the GCR for their Winter Gala, where GNR N2 Tank No1744 is spotted on the Quorn turntable...
In June, as part of the secret plot to visit and look over what would later become No4436, myself and 'Eddie the Late' visited the Kirklees Light Railway at Clayton West. This quaint 15" gauge line runs for around 4 miles with pretty little engines built by an experimental engineer. We were lucky enough to catch a footplate ride on the little red 0-6-2 "Fox"...
July saw another excursion to 15" gauge with a visit to the seaside railway at Cleethorpes. The CCLR was operating an American based locomotive: No24...
In August during our Bala visit, myself & Eddie did the 'Round Trip' of the Ffestiniog Railway and the Welsh Highland Railway, via main line to Bangor and bus to Caernarfon. It was a grand day out featuring two railways I'd never been to. First, the Ffestiniog with a historic Double Fairlie...
Having managed to do the round trip to Caernarfon in time we were treated to a run behind one of South Africa's Garrett's through amazing scenery in perfect weather. I was really taken with the WHR; a truly awe-inspiring achievement...
In September myself and Maisie were away again and caught a round trip behind a huge 9F 2-10-0 at the North Norfolk Railway. The BR black liveried No92203 "Black Prince" barely even thought about breaking a sweat...
October saw another day out, this time to Tyseley Locomotive Works where we were treated to the delights of some of the Great Western's finest creations...
Well that's it, I won't bore you anymore folks. Naturally there are more visits to talk about: Severn Valley, Welland and GEC to name but a few but that'll continue to bore you. All in all its been another great year and with 111 posts on the blog I think its all been worth it once again. Hopefully 2015 will bring more outings, more experience and more steam engines! Thanks for reading folks and thanks for your continued support. All the best, Sam...

Sunday, 28 December 2014

A Festive "Severn Valley Limited"...

Hi everyone. Once again, as per, today we were on our annual jaunt to the Severn Valley Railway for their 'Festive Season Lunch Train'. A frosty but clear morning allowed us a good run up the M42 out towards Kidderminster and we arrived at Midday, in good time for our 12:50 departure. At the head of the 'Limited' stock stood Ivatt Class 4 No43106, built at Darlington in 1951 and affectionately known as the "Flying Pig". We headed down into the festively decorated station area before having a cuppa' in the Valley Suite...
After our tea we walked along Platform 2 and boarded the 'Limited'. The festively decorated train was cosy and tables were set for the 4-course dinner...
The "Flying Pig" departed on time at 12:50 and took us on a leisurely run along the 16-miles of picturesque track. A hearty Tomato & Red Pepper soup, prior to passing 9F 92214 at Bewdley, was followed by Turkey and all the trimmings, by which point I was already stuffed. Desert and Tea was to be served on the return journey but an abrupt stop a mile or so from the terminus at Bridgnorth soon aroused suspicion. An hour later, the train still had not moved. The friendly restaurant car staff served the tasty deserts and tea whilst we awaited some news. 43106 had failed with what later transpired to be a broken snifting valve, probably meaning that any steam applied through the regulator was just leaking to atmosphere. A powerful but very slow diesel shunter of the Class 11 type had been deployed from Bridgnorth to assist, and dragged the train the rest of the way, eventually arriving around 75 minutes late. An impatient GWR 28xx No2857 had been waiting to depart for Kidderminster for some time...
Upon arrival at Bridgnorth the Diners were quickly removed from the 'Limited' stock and were asked to board the very late train behind 2857. This two trains into one operation provided the 28' with a very well loaded Mk1 train and seats were a virtue. I took this quick shot of the terminus station as we crossed the bridge...
With all passengers crammed on, 2857 duly left but little could be done to make up for lost time. Having passed 92214 at Hampton Loade with another no doubt late train, we crossed with a Class 20 running light at Bewdley. The 20 was no doubt on its way to collect the Limited stock. 2857 is captured here following arrival at Kidderminster's Platform 1 well over an hour late...
All this simply goes to show that even the best of railways have their problems occasionally. The failure of 43106 put the timetable over an hour out for the rest of the day and the crew aboard 2857 would have been no doubt put out by their late running. You can't blame the SVR for todays goings on as you can't account for loco failure and, particularly not as Diners, because we did get our very nice meal nonetheless. However, I will say that the communication between the operating staff wasn't good as even the restaurant car ladies didn't seem aware of the reason for delay until an hour had elapsed. Ahh well, can't be helped. Anyway, following our late return to Kidderminster it was back out onto the motorway for the frosty drive home. All the best guys, Sam... 

Friday, 26 December 2014

Boxing Day With An Eight Freight...

Hi there all. Here's hoping you all had a great Christmas: ate too much, drank too much, watched several repeats of old comedy shows and so on. Today a few of us who operate the steam locos at Shackerstone went on a local outing to the 'railway over the hill': the Great Central. The GCR was running its Christmas Holiday Trains, with two locomotives in steam. Operating the normal train service was the affectionately dubbed 'Duch-Eight': an 8F in Duchess' clothing: No48624. The last surviving Southern built 8F, completed in 1943 at Ashford Works, 48624 wears a form of BR crimson livery, much to the upset of some die hard enthusiasts. However, if you own a loco you should be able to have it whatever colour you want! One of 852 members of the Stanier 8F Class, 48624 carries the unique pedigree of LMS performance and power. Stanier developed the eight no doubt from the GWRs own 2-8-0s, as he was a Swindon man initially. The LMS 8F turned out to be a brilliant performer and was heralded as the engine that helped win the war. They worked both at home and overseas during the conflict, and at least 15 are known to have found a place in preservation, whether straight from service with BR or following repatriation from overseas. We caught 48624's train at Quorn at 11:22, and rode the steam-heated stock to Leicester North, where the 8F duly ran round...
4ft 8.5" wheels, a 225psi boiler and 18.5" x 28" cylinders come together to provide an engine capable of churning out 32,440lbs of tractive effort, though that is interestingly 3000lbs less than the GWR 2884 class...
The locomotive is spotted here, having run round, drawing forward onto the waiting stock...
Another capture of 48624: the 'Duch Eight'...
Having recoupled to the stock, 48624 duly departed. These 8's do make all the right noises. As much as I like a Great Western beat, the Stanier's have a dull sound all of their own. They almost roar whereas the GWR type tends to bark. Riding back to Loughborough the 8F certainly got some chat on, a liberal 24.9mph me thinks. One thing you do notice quite characteristically with the 8's is that their snifting valves always rattle when shut-off. No doubt the engine would be in drift position on the screw reverser, but the snifters still chatter. You often tell an eight like that by sound. Having stuffed the face with a sausage, bacon and egg cob from the buffet car on the run, we left the train at Loughborough to have a wander around the yard. 48624 was just backing up having overshot the water column...
In the sidings at Loughborough there is always some interest. One engine that I always feel is unheralded in the preservation world is "Sir Lamiel": Southern Railway No777. Owned by the NRM and based at Loughborough, the 1925-built N15 4-6-0 always seems to live a quiet life, and today was spotted stood behind D123. Her huge 6ft 7" wheels must give her some real speed on the main, and I have footplated this engine in the past with the help of a GCR pass. Click here for that post...
Down outside the loco shed, cold and waiting for new tyres so we hear, was the impressive bulk of another NRM gem: 70013 "Oliver Cromwell". These Brit's are, to say the least, bloody big! Built at Crewe in 1951, 70013 would later gain fame hauling the last steam railtour for BR in 1968: the "Fifteen Guinea Special"...
Another shot of 70013 "Oliver Cromwell": an impressive beast...
Meandering your way around the various relics on the shed front is most enjoyable. As well as complete engines there are boilers galore, notably ones from West Country Pacific "Boscastle" and 8F 48305. After our wander we joined 48624 again with the 1pm departure from Loughborough, arriving at Quorn not long after, where I detrained...
It was a pleasant morning out on the GCR and now its off home for another Xmas party. Thanks to Pockets & Carl for the invite and thank you all for reading. All the best, Sam...

Sunday, 21 December 2014

Christmas Cooking with Gomer...

Hi there guys. After an enjoyable day on the 38' yesterday, it was time for another day on "Sir Gomer". I arrived at Shackerstone at 6:30am to find Fireman Mick already there with the fire lit. After a cuppa' I began my usual tasks of oiling up. Oiling up the Peckett without a pit is hard work, scrambling around underneath the engine in the ash and the mud. Meanwhile Mick was polishing away, making "Sir Gomer" look pretty. After plenty of cleaning, oiling and tea drinking, we dropped the Peckett out of the shed at around 9am, before dropping down onto the stock for the 11:30 trip at 9:30. "Sir Gomer" was then used to steam heat the stock as per, whilst 3803 steamed over onto the front of the 10am Classic. Manning the 38' today was 2/3 of the Dudley Moore Trio, supplemented today by Jamie. Having got away slightly behind time, Team 38' had managed to claw back a few minutes by the time they'd done the 10-mile round trip, with "Sir Gomer" ready and waiting to take over the stock...
The 38' having been swiftly uncoupled, we ran the Peckett up onto the waiting stock and then drew it down into Platform 2. 3803 was meanwhile coupled up to the 11:30, vacuumed up and ready to go. Once the 38' had cleared, "Sir Gomer" remained on what was now the rear of the 1pm Classic, steam heating away...
Mick then got busy with the shovel and the breakfast. We'd already had mince pies and cups of tea galore but the breakfast was still top of the menu. First, the sausages go in...
With the sausages cooked and ready for the waiting cobs, it was time for the bacon to hit the shovel. Having spent a while over the fire cooking the sausages, the heat retained by the shovel would mean that the bacon would not take long...
Following the bacon, on went the eggs. The resulting sausage, bacon and egg cobs were wonderful. I must take my hat off to Mick as the chef: well done mate. I've never been much for the cooking on the shovel, but I love eating the food: I'd rather provide the food than cook it as something always goes wrong with my Frank Spencer routines. Once we'd had dinner we attained permission from the signalbox to steam through the stop boards until we were behind No7 signal. Road set and signal off, we steamed through Platform 1 and waited for the arrival of the 38'. When 3803 arrived and uncoupled, off we went again. "Gomer" dragged in the returning Deluxe, with many happy passengers aboard. The loco then once again remained on the tail end steam heating until the 38' had cleared with the 1pm Classic. The Peckett was then uncoupled and run round through No7 up to the water tower to replenish the 1000-gallon water tank. Here, Mick is sat atop the saddle tank doing the watering...
Following watering it was time to steam up to the signalbox and drop over onto the waiting 2:30pm Deluxe to continue steam heating. After another cuppa' and some good old chat, we were given the signal to return to Platform 2 road to await 3803 again. Here, Mick has captured me oiling the piston glands...
"Me Doing The Glands" (M.Jones - Fireman)
Having hauled in the returning 1pm Classic, the day went on much as it started. We had been asked to draw what was now the 4pm outward Classic down to the crossing once everyone was off; thus allowing the 38' to take water before the last train. So, once we'd drawn the stock down, we steamed through Platform 1 and onto the front of the 4pm to continue steam heating. After, yes, another cuppa' and a hot pasty (yes more food!) we steamed back over into Platform 1 to await 3803. Having hauled in the returning 2:30pm Deluxe, the 4pm got away only a few minutes down. "Sir Gomer" was then ran round onto the front ready for the shunt-release of 3803 when she returned. Meanwhile, we changed our beverage from tea to Coca Cola; just for a change! The 38' soon returned and a small chorus of whistles ensued before "Sir Gomer" pulled the empty Deluxe stock out & over the cross-over to clear No11 road for the 38'. The 38' then steamed in a care free manner up into the loco shed for disposal. Myself & Mick were then watched back with the stock by Brian & Richard, who had kindly hung around to help with the shunt, undertaken in complete darkness. Stock shunted back and secured, "Sir Gomer" was uncoupled and taken to the shed for final disposal. This had been a very pleasant day on the footplate: we'd run fairly to time, had a laugh and stuffed our faces silly with all kinds of food & drink...a grand day out! Thanks to Mick for a great day and fair play to the Dudley Moore Pair + 1 on 3803. Merry Christmas one & all. That's Shackerstone probably done for me for 2014. Another great year on the railway. All the best...

Saturday, 20 December 2014

Christmas Cracker with 3803...

Hi there everyone. Well, Christmas is pretty much here now and the Santa Specials at the Battlefield Line have been in full swing for a few weekends. This morning I was rostered aboard GWR 3803; the large 2884 class 2-8-0. I arrived at 6:30am to find the "Gomer" crew of Carl & James already there. Carl then kindly made me a cuppa' whilst I went to look at the condition of the 38'. Three quarters of a glass of water, a still burning warming fire and a good pressure on the clock: perfect! The tender was full of coal & water, the loco fairly clean and the fire fit to be continued by adding more coal as & when; what could be better? Fellow crewman Pockets then turned up and decided that he would like to fire for the day so I began the oiling duties. Starting with the hydrostatic lubricator on the footplate, you can then start making your way around the rest of the engine. To put it into perspective, off the top of my head, there is the following to oil:
  • 32 Axlebox Pots
  • 8 Coupling Rod Pots
  • 2 Big Ends, 2 Little Ends
  • 4 Crosshead Oiling Points (2 Each)
  • 4 Eccentrics
  • 2 Brakeshaft Oiling Points
  • 6 Trunnion Points
  • 4 Valve Rod Points
  • 2 Rocker Arm Points
  • 2 Die Blocks
  • Reachrod Pin
  • 6 Points on the Expansion Links
  • 2 Weighshaft Pin Holes
  • 4 Coupling Rod Pin Holes
  • 2 Piston Gland Pots
  • 2 Pots for the Vac Pump
  • Front Step = Large Pot (2 Points Within), Top Hat
  • Front Bogie Pin (Grease)
The points above add up to 89 alone, and that's just off the top of my head. When you are actually oiling up the engine you make your way around in an orderly manner, oiling everything as you go. There are probably more points that I can't recall at this exact moment but the engine isn't in front of me as I write. As well as all this you also oil other non oil point parts like buffer shanks, shackle screws, buffer faces, wheel back face, slide bars and so on and so on. There is a lot more to oiling a loco than most people believe. Many parts will last the day on one oiling but I tend to oil slide bars every trip or so, and oil the wheel backs every other trip and the die-blocks: just a habit. Anyway, back to us, Pockets had built a good fire by the time I'd finished oiling and the loco was ready to leave the shed at 9am. "Sir Gomer" was all ready, cleaned and polished and left the shed to steam up onto the back road to allow us out...
Having checked the engine over thoroughly, I warmed her through and did the usual brake tests before we left shed. 3803 was then put onto the head of the 10am Classic train, whilst "Sir Gomer" was already heating the 11:30 Deluxe. The pair are pictured here before we do our vac test prior to departure...
All of todays trains were fairly well loaded and the 38' performed well with its various tasks. We even ran generally to time which is a god send in itself. We were joined on the footplate today by the new SRS President, Mr Johnson. As a trainee I spent many enjoyable days on the footplate with 'Jono', particularly when paired up with Mr Britt as their continued mocking of one another made the day fly by! With the combined efforts today of Jono and Pockets, the stick I got was constant and thorough! Following two successful first trips: one with the Classic and one with the Deluxe: Pockets used the shovel for its other purpose...cooking. Whilst the 38' simmered away ready for the 1pm departure, he was busy cooking our sausage cobs...
Stomachs replenished, the loco is later spotted waiting at Market Bosworth for the 5-minute interval with the Classic train. The forlorn wooden bodied wagon to the right is also wooden framed with only the casual holding hands of the wood-worm keeping it together!...
Following the 1pm trip it was time for another Deluxe at 2:30pm before, finally, a last Classic trip at 4pm. By now we had only lost 7 minutes of time which is a far cry from last weeks 85 minutes, though the extenuating circumstances of last Sunday must be considered. 3803 performed well throughout the day, steaming & pulling easily. She returned to the shed at about right time and was disposed of appropriately. It had been a very pleasant day with Pockets and Jono and it now really feels like Christmas. Have a good one, one & all. Merry Christmas...

Sunday, 14 December 2014

"Sir Gomer" Does The Blues...

Hi everyone. Today I was rostered to drive the Station Pilot: "Sir Gomer": during the Battlefield Line's on-going 'Santa Special's. "Sir Gomer" was on only her second day of service, having returned to work following axle repairs. Regular readers will remember that the engine ran a hot box on Christmas Eve last year, and was stripped during January and February as part of the repair work. Due to a very busy summer season for the railway, the engine saw out the last few months in the shed but was taken to Burton in autumn for repair. There she had very heavy and useful equipment at her disposal and was lifted almost immediately. The damaged lead axle went away to Tyseley for journal repairs and both of the front brasses have had white metal pockets fitted. All six of the axleboxes have had new pads fitted and underkeeps with fillers, which she didn't have before. She used to run on steam oil for her axleboxes, now she is on typical bearing oil with the correct pads. The team have also repainted the engine into a new livery (which is close to Coal Board Blue) and fitted her new nameplates. The engine returned to Shackerstone on Wednesday following successful testing. "Sir Gomer"s work on the Santa's is the Shackerstone pilot, with duties including carriage warming, shunting and dragging trains in from the box to speed up departures behind 3803. I arrived at Shackerstone in the chilly dark of the morn at around 6:30am. Fireman Danny arrived at around 7am and after the usual checks had lit a good, strong fire...
We spent the first few hours of the day, as normal, prepping the engine. It was very nice to have "Sir Gomer" back; now a beast in blue. Once I'd finished crawling all over and under the engine doing the oiling: as 3803 was over the pit steaming up in the hands of the Dudley Moore Trio: myself & Danny polished the engine up. The new paint was shining nicely when we left the shed at the booked time of 9:30am. First job: carriage warming for the 11:30 Deluxe train, in Platform 1...
Below is a portrait of the new livery and nameplates. Those nameplates have been waiting in the wings for some years now, but now that she has a new livery that will be kept, the plates have been fitted to add to her new look...
One thing Danny is especially good at is cooking on the shovel; a trait that he often proclaims that I am not good at! Anyone who has ever got in early to prep a steam locomotive will know what I'm saying when I say that a bacon cob is longed for on these winter mornings. Danny's special bacon, egg, sausage cobs were more than welcome...
Whilst myself & Danny stuffed our faces on the footplate, "Sir Gomer" was simmering away, heating the 11:30 stock. Just after us, 3803 had left shed too. The Dudley Moore Trio were in for a hard day at the head of all five of the Santa departures, but they were smiling before they left on the 10am trip...
The days engines: a festively decorated 3803 in GWR Green and 1859 in Coal Board Blue...
Once the 10am train had left, we heated the train until just gone 11am. The Peckett was then uncoupled and steamed up and over the cross-over to the signalbox. We then backed down into the Platform 2 road to await 3803 under the protection of the signals. When the 38' arrived she uncoupled before steaming into Platform 1 road to couple up to the waiting Deluxe stock. We then took "Sir Gomer" up onto the Classic stock, coupled up and pulled the train in...
"Sir Gomer Pulls In, by R.Mathieson"
"Passing 3803, by R.Mathieson"
Once 3803 had left with the 11:30am train, we moved the Classic stock down slightly before uncoupling and heading down for coal...
The reflection of a Peckett...
Following coaling the day went on much the same as it began: shunting & heating, heating & shunting. "Sir Gomer" is seen here heating the 1pm Classic departure, on the south end of the train...
The last move for "Sir Gomer" yesterday was to drag in the returning 2:30pm Deluxe after heating the 4pm Classic. The engine is seen here waiting in Platform 1 for the 38' to reach the signalbox...
After her last move, "Sir Gomer" ran round the Deluxe stock before pulling into the shed road via junction No11. The Peckett is seen here outside the loco shed whilst Danny cleans the fire. The engine was taken into the shed for final disposal soon after...
"A Final Picture"
With the engine secure she was then bedded down for the night. Handbrake on, boiler full, fire dead and pressure lowered, the Peckett was left for the night in a safe & stable condition. Myself & Danny had had a long and tiring day on "Sir Gomer" but it was a lot less stressful than life out on the line. The blue livery is growing on me: she looks handsome. Thanks to Danny for a great day. All the best guys, Sam...